ERDF Rhône-Alpes Bourgogne shares its view on the exchange of local energy data

Energee-Watch

ERDF_TRUCK

Point of view of a representative of ErDF Rhône-Alpes Burgundy within OREGES Rhône-Alpes, the Regional Observatory of Energy and Greenhouse Gases

For the last 5 years, ERDF has been a partner of the OREGES – Regional Energy and Greenhouse Gas Observatory of Rhône-Alpes – to exchange, collect, produce and disseminate information on the different components of the production and consumption of energy and emissions of greenhouse gases in the Rhône-Alpes region.

Q: What lessons can you draw from your partnership with the OREGES?

ERDF manages 95% of the MV / LV distribution network in France and is committed alongside the OREGES to participate in the regional effort in sustainable energy planning.

Each year, we provide the OREGES with consumption data from our energy metering systems. This data includes, for example, the annual electricity consumption aggregated by municipality. The data may also include new renewable electricity installations (PV, wind, hydro) and the respective powers.

The data is transmitted to the OREGES via electronic files sent each year. In addition, ErDF responds to ad hoc requests from the OREGES to explain certain consumptions or ensure the reliability of some energy data. The current deployment in France of the Linky smart meters system will enable us to consider new services in the field of data provision while respecting confidentiality.

Q: What is the main added value for ERDF?

The establishment of a regional centralized approach to the collection and analysis of data such as the OREGES Observatory has several advantages for a network operator like us, two in particular:

  • Participation in the local contribution to climate action:
    As manager of the public electricity network, we are committed to meeting regional and local authorities’ sustainable energy planning needs.
    Our participation in the partnership approach of the OREGES Observatory, through its Technical Committee, enables us to support the regional effort of providing multi-energy data for the definition and monitoring of climate plans.
    In exchange, this multi-stakeholder body enables us to better anticipate the future needs of communities and territories, for example on data requirements for the development and monitoring of local Sustainable Energy and Climate Action Plans.
  •  Ensure the reliability of the data used in local climate plans:
    We see a growing commitment of local authorities to developing their own territorial climate action strategy.
    Without a centralized data collection and analysis system, technical experts can be brought to engage in an ad hoc data collection approach or in making assumptions and estimates with high degrees of uncertainty. It is then difficult to measure trends and draw lessons for the adaptation notably of the electrical networks.

A multi-energy centralized approach enables better data reliability for example by comparing them. It also enables to automate the response system to local authorities, thereby improving the quality of the data provision service for climate plans.

Q: DATA4ACTION is the European project which aims to develop Regional Energy and Greenhouse Gas Observatories across Europe. What advice would you give these new Observatories? What are the pitfalls?

Regional and local climate action is paramount. Regional observatories such as the OREGES have a central role because they support local authorities in the definition and monitoring of their sustainable energy and climate action plans.

These observatories are working in a very dynamic and evolving context. The drivers of change are many, including: the opening of the energy market and the arrival of new players in the energy sector, the changes in the competencies of different administrative strata, increasingly complex local planning regulations which incorporate sustainable energy in urban planning, ecology, economy and transportation.

These developments will have an effect on the demand for the provision of data, its availability, transfer and reliability. It is therefore important for Regional Observatories to have this prospective view on the demand and the supply of data at the regional and local levels.

This prospective vision is possible through the involvement in European co-funded projects such as DATA4ACTION and through the participation – or if necessary creation of – national and European networks of Regional Observatories.

This prospective vision is also desirable at the regional level by the necessary establishment of a partnership approach and a multi-actor and multi-level governance involving the communities and energy stakeholders.

.


Open Discussion on the Clean Air and Climate Protection Software

Local governments can use the Clean Air and Climate Protection Software (CACPS) to develop greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant inventories for government operations, or to create a community-wide emissions estimate. CACPS also allows users to forecast emissions and create an emissions reduction plan.

New Observatory! ROECC – Regional Observatory for Energy, Environment and Climate, BG

The Energy Agency of Plovdiv has established the Regional Observatory for Energy, Environment and Climate (ROECC – http://observatory.eap-save.eu/) in the South Central and South East Region with the aim to support local authorities in their development, monitoring and evaluation of local actions dedicated to the European 20-20-20 target and other national targets.

Climate Alliance EcoRegion software tool, EU

The tool is intended to provide municipalities and regions with a basis to establish their CO2 profile and assess their local and regional climate strategies. It is based on software called ECORegionsmart specifically developed by the Swiss company Ecospeed for computing local CO2 and energy balances.It can be ordered online and used immediately as an internet service. After a small amount of data has been entered, ECORegion calculates a first initial balance, using default values from a database built on national statistical data with some computing added. The computations use factors like fleet average consumption, emission factors, etc.

Interview: Francisco Olarreaga, Head of Iberdrola's Institutional Delegation for the Basque Country

Interview with Francisco Olarreaga, Head of Iberdrola’s Institutional Delegation for the Basque Country What lessons can you draw from your partnership with Udalsarea’s Basque Observatory for Local Sustainability? Energy consumption is a key indicator of socio-economic development and the success of sustainability and climate change policies. Public authorities need an overview of the socio-economic system […]